Histology: Guide to special stains

This handbook guides you through fixation, tissue processing and the different staining methods. Content includes: Introduction to Special Stains Historical Perspective 1; Clinical Relevance 2 The Biology of Special Stains The Cell 5; Tissue 6; Pathogens 8 The Chemistry of Special Stains Basic Chemistry 14; Principles Of Staining 15 Fixation and Tissue Processing Fixation 17; Specimen Processing 21 Staining Methods: Nucleus and Cytoplasm Hematoxylin and Eosin 24; Nucleic Acids 29; Polychromatic Stains 31 Staining Methods:Connective Tissue, Muscle Fibers and Lipids Connective Tissue 34; Reticular Fibers 35; Basement Membranes 36; Elastic Fibers 38; Mast Cells 39; Muscle 41; Trichrome Stains 41; PTAH 44; Modified Russel-Movat Pentachrome 45; Lipids 46 Staining Methods: Carbohydrates and Amyloid Carbohydrates 48; Amyloid 48; Periodic Acid-Schiff (PAS) 49; PAS with Diastase 51; Mucicarmine 52; Alcian Blue 53; Alcian Blue/PAS 55; Colloidal Iron 56; Congo Red 57 Staining Methods: Microorganisms Bacteria 60; Fungi 61; Protozoans 61; Gram Stain 62; Acid-Fast Bacteria Stain 63; Grocott’s Methenamine Silver Stain 64; Warthin-Starry Stain 65; Alcian Yellow/Toluidine Blue Stain 66; Giemsa Stain 68; Periodic Acid-Schiff-Green Stain 69 Staining Methods: Pigments and Minerals Melanin 71; Hemosiderin 73; Lipofuscin 74; Urates 75; Bile 76; Calcium 77; Copper 78 Staining Methods: Nervous System Cresyl Violet Stain 80; Bielschowsky Method 81; Glial Cells 82; Myelin 84 Automation of Special Stains Overview 86; Advantages 86; Considerations

Year prepared: 

2009